Casino Script - transcript from the screenplay and/or ...

Casino Royale — How Action Reveals Character | Lessons From The Screenplay

Casino Royale — How Action Reveals Character | Lessons From The Screenplay submitted by kortizoll to movies [link] [comments]

Casino Royale — How Action Reveals Character — Lessons from the Screenplay

Casino Royale — How Action Reveals Character — Lessons from the Screenplay submitted by throwaway_video_bot to throwaway_the_videos [link] [comments]

Lessons From the Screenplay on How “Casino Royale” Uses Action to Reveal Character

Lessons From the Screenplay on How “Casino Royale” Uses Action to Reveal Character submitted by Shagrrotten to IMDbFilmGeneral [link] [comments]

[Lessons from the screenplay] Casino Royale — How Action Reveals Character

[Lessons from the screenplay] Casino Royale — How Action Reveals Character submitted by PoufPoal to Cultube [link] [comments]

Reddit Chosen Oscars: Choose the 1995 Winners

Reddit Chosen Oscars: Choose the 1995 Winners submitted by JuanRiveara to Oscars [link] [comments]

The Secrets Hidden in the Casino Royale Screenplays - Mental Floss

The Secrets Hidden in the Casino Royale Screenplays - Mental Floss submitted by akanefive to JamesBond [link] [comments]

The curse of "No Time To Die"

General info
-Development of No Time to Die began in early 2016.
-In March 2017, screenwriters Neal Purvis and Robert Wade—who have worked on every Bond film since The World Is Not Enough (1999)—were approached to write the script.
-Sam Mendes stated that he would not return after directing Skyfall and Spectre.
-In February 2018, Danny Boyle was established as a frontrunner for the directing position.
-Boyle's original pitch to Broccoli and Wilson saw John Hodge writing a screenplay based on Boyle's idea with Purvis and Wade's version scrapped.
-Hodge's draft was greenlit, and Boyle was confirmed to helm the film with a production start date of December 2018.
-Danny Boyle and Hodge left the production in August 2018 due to creative differences.
-Following Boyle's departure, the film's release date became contingent on whether the studio could find a replacement within sixty days.
-Cary Joji Fukunaga was announced as the new director in September 2018.
-Fukunaga became the first American in the history of the series to direct an Eon Productions Bond film and the first director to receive a writing credit for any version
-Purvis and Wade were brought back to start working on a new script with Fukunaga in September 2018.
-Casino Royale and Quantum of Solace screenwriter Paul Haggis turned in an uncredited rewrite in November 2018, with Scott Z. Burns doing the same in February 2019.
-Fleabag and Killing Eve writer and creator Phoebe Waller-Bridge provided a script polish in April 2019.
Filming
-Production was scheduled to begin on 3 December 2018 at Pinewood Studios
-Filming was delayed until April 2019 after the departure of Boyle as director.
-Daniel Craig sustained an ankle injury in May whilst filming in Jamaica and subsequently underwent minor surgery
-Production was further interrupted when a controlled explosion damaged the 007 Stage at Pinewood Studios and left a crew member with minor injuries
Music
-In July 2019, Dan Romer was announced as composer for the film's score
-Romer left the film due to creative differences in November 2019
-Hans Zimmer replaced Romer by January 2020.
-It is the first time in the Bond series history that a composer has been replaced during post-production, and the second major personnel change for the film after Boyle left as director.
Release date
-The release of No Time to Die was originally scheduled for 25th of October (premiere) and first week of November 2019 for the rest of the world
-The release of No Time to Die was postponed to 14 February 2020
-The release of No Time to Die was postponed to 3rd April 2020 in the UK and 8th April in the USA.
-The release of No Time to Die was postponed to 12th November 2020 in UK and 20th November 2020 for US
-The release of No Time to Die was postponed to 2 April 2021
submitted by dragonsky to JamesBond [link] [comments]

Boke and Hitch (redux)

Hitchcock is Bokenkamp’s greatest inspiration as a creator. No question.
We’ve covered a list of nods to Hitchcock we’ve seen in TBL. From time to time I like to drop in some quotes tying JB and Hitch together. That’s all this post is.
I’ve seen a number of references to films JB has been influenced by—Se7en, Silence of the Lambs, Oceans 11, Three Days of the Codor, Marathon Man, etc—but I’m aware of him referring to only two books: one that contains an interview with Hitchcock, and one about Hitchcock, and one he used as a basis for a screenplay. I think this sheds light on what kind of storyteller he is and what his priorities are.
Here are some relevant remarks JB made in a 2017 interview, which I have posted at least once previously, followed by some Hitchcock references (comments by and about) I pulled together recently. The Hitchcock references might strike a familiar note.
BOKENKAMP
“I’m not good at, ‘Ok, so these are the thematics. It’s a story about love and it’s about X’ .... I read in a book where Hitchcock was talking about movies. He said, ‘We develop a hardy plot and themes emerge as we go along.’ And I thought, Oh thank God. Somebody murdered somebody, they’re burying the body. Later you can go back and figure out, Oh, the body is a metaphor for his mother. I can’t think like that. I’m not smart enough to think that way. For me it’s the big moves. For me it’s about 4 big moves. Or 6. Or 2. Whether it’s an episode or a pitch or a script or movie, I find those moves and then fill in the details.”

Q: With Reddington and why he’s in Agent Keen’s life, what are the mythological archetypes?
A: When you say mythology, I really just mean backstory. I mean, who is —
Q: I thought you meant Joseph Campbell sort of —
A: No, I wish. Oh my God. Nah!
Q: — This is the messenger, and here are the different fairy tales that came from ...
Q: No, that feels very English 101. I’m not, I don’t know that stuff. I feel it: Ok, this is a man versus himself story, man versus nature ... I’m sure we tell those kinds of stories. What I mean when I say we go to the mythology, I just mean we dip into the larger backstory of, What’s really going on? In the X-Files: is the truth really out there? Every third of fourth episode they’d go ... Monster show, monster show, and then they’d have an episode: Here’s a story about these two people, and who are they really, what’s going on with them? So that’s kind of what we do. We flip back and forth. No, I wish we were doing full-on Joseph Campbell stuff. That’d be great.

“You’re borrowing pieces [from films you’ve seen] ... you find little touchstones, little signposts that get you excited. That you want to reference - not reference, rip off. Something like, I want to do something like that! ... look, if it’s a heist movie, I don’t know how I don’t think about Oceans 11. If we’re making a heist episode, what were some of the fun moves there? A sequence with all the people coming together and they all have a different role ... and then you try to make it as different and unique as you can.”
HITCHCOCK
Hitchcock: “I’m not concerned with plausibility. Must film be logical when life is not?”
Hitchcock: “Logic is dull.”
Hitchcock: “Plausibility for the sake of plausibility doesn’t help.”
Hitchcock: "To be quite honest, I am not interested in content at all. I don't give a damn what the film is about. I am more interested in how to handle the material to create an emotion in an audience."
Hitchcock: “Then, of course, the cleverness of the device of transvestism. I am aware that I am equipped with what other people have called a fiendish sense of humor.”
Hitchcock: “I could have made up three scenes just to give that woman a reason for being there, but they would have been completely uninteresting ... Let's be logical. If you're going to analyze everything in terms of plausibility and credibility, then no fiction film can stand up to that approach, and you wind up with a documentary ... To insist that a storyteller stick to the facts is just as ridiculous as to demand of a representative painter that he show objects accurately ... we should have total freedom to do as we like, so long as it’s not dull.”
Hitchcock: “If Pyscho had been in tended as a serious picture, it would have been shown as a clinical case with no mystery or suspense. The material would have been used as a documentation of a case history. We have already mentioned that total plausibility and authenticity merley add up to a documentary. In the mystery-and-suspense genre, a tongue-in-cheek approach is indespensible ... you have to go along with the idea that truth is stranger than fiction.”
Francois Truffaut: "In Hitchcock's personal form of cinematic storytelling, suspense ... plays an important role. [It is] the dilation of a span of time, the exaggeration of a pause, the emphasis on all that makes our hearts beat a little harder, a little faster."
New York Times: “Spinning his sophisticated yarns to create maximum tension, Mr. Hitchcock was not concerned with plausibility, which he regarded as no more important than the MacGuffin, the term he used for the device about which his suspense revolved, whether it be the secret or documents or whatever the villains were seeking or trying to protect.”
New York Times: "Detractors accused Mr. Hitchcock of relying on slick tricks, illogical story lines and wild coincidences, but he usually did not allow viewers time to ponder implausibilities because of the whiplike speed of his films."
New York Times: "Detractors acknowledged his technical expertise in entertaining, but faulted his films for lacking substance and significance, for moral opportunism and for being cynical, superficial and glib in their views of human nature."
New York Times: "Hitchcock was one of the cinema's great psychologists, not so much in his handling of character within his films, but in his handling of his audiences' responses: he seemed, in effect, to direct his audiences far more than he directed his films."
New York Times: "He was the great master of shock effects, of lulling audiences into a sense of security before hitting them hardest."
Vanity Fair:
Another myth about Hitchcock is that he was a perfectionist whose films are models of meticulous pre-production, surface plausibility, and narrative coherence. Using his celebrated storyboards (many of which are reprinted in Hitchcock’s Notebooks), he would map out the movie like an extended comic strip. The actual filming would be a faithful transference of his sketchbook to celluloid.
Hitchcock undeniably did his homework, but his homework often had a lot of holes. Reviewing Secret Agent (1936) in the London Spectator, Graham Greene noted such laughable absurdities as “the secret agent who loudly discusses his instructions in front of the hall porter of a Swiss hotel and who brandishes his only clue to a murder in a crowded casino,” and lamented, “How unfortunate it is that Mr. Hitchcock, a clever director, is allowed to produce and even to write his own films, though as a producer he has no sense of continuity and as a writer he has no sense of life.”
Hitchcock’s work was always glitchy. The critic Manny Farber cited “a speeding car in which the only thing moving is Ingrid Bergman’s overteased coiffure” in Notorious (1946); Rope has a scene in which Farley Granger, giving one of the worst performances of anyone’s career as a member of a Leopold-Loeb pair, smashes a glass he’s holding in a moment of fright and soon after sits down at the piano to play, both hands unbandaged (he would have been bleeding all over the keys); and Camille Paglia considered the New England accent of the shopkeeper in The Birds (1963), which is set in Bodega Bay, California, “a major gaffe.” In Hitchcock’s later work—papier-mâché puppetry of Cold War intrigue such as Torn Curtain (1966) and Topaz (1969)—the fakery (rear projections, tacky sets) showed Hitchcock unable to keep up a good front.
Recording such flubs is not to engage in revisionism at Hitchcock’s expense but to place his strengths and flaws in perspective. As Manny Farber wrote, “To put Hitchcock either up or down isn’t the point; the point is sticking to the material as it is, rather than drooling over behind-the-camera feats of engineering.” Hitchcock’s greatness is as a pictorial showman—a creator of billboards—not as a conscientious realist.
submitted by outofwedlock to TheBlackList [link] [comments]

[Thu, Jan 07 2021] TL;DR — This is what you missed in the last 24 hours on Reddit

worldnews

Angela Merkel: Trump shares blame for US Capitol storming
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New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern: Democracy "should never be undone by a mob"
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Mexican president offers to vaccinate unlawful migrants in U.S.
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news

Congress has certified the 270 Electoral College votes needed to confirm Joe Biden's presidential election win.
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Warnock, Ossoff win in Georgia, handing Dems Senate control
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Police remove barriers to mob storming US capitol, taking selfies
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science

Before the pandemic, one-third of US households with children were already “net worth poor,” lacking enough financial resources to sustain their families for 3 months at a poverty level. Their savings are virtually nil, and they have no financial cushion to provide the basics for their children.
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US politicians who engage in “negative partisanship”, referring to hostile, nonsubstantive rhetoric about an opposing party or statements emphasizing defeats of partisan opponents, are not rewarded with higher evaluations from citizens. Voters don’t want representation focused around polarization.
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For young adults in the 18–24-year-old age group, pornography was the most commonly endorsed helpful source about how to have sex, as compared to other possible options such as sexual partners, friends, media, and health care professionals. This was more likely for males and heterosexuals.
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space

NASA wants to deorbit the International Space Station before the end of this decade. Axiom plans to replace the International Space Station and potentially save NASA billions per year.
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Galaxy-Size Bubbles Discovered Towering Over the Milky Way. For decades, astronomers debated whether a particular smudge was close-by and small, or distant and huge. A new X-ray map supports the massive option.
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Earth is whipping around quicker than it has in a half-century
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Futurology

‘Incredible’ gene-editing result in mice inspires plans to treat premature-aging syndrome (Progeria) in children
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New Atlas: New catalyst converts common plastic waste into fuels (77%) and wax (15%)
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U.S. law sets stage for boost to artificial intelligence research
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AskReddit

Couples therapists, without breaking confidentiality, what are some relationships that instantly set off red flags, and do you try and get them to work out?
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What were weird myths you thought about sex as a kid?
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What’s the greatest mental health tip you’ve gotten?
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todayilearned

TIL in 2013, a 9 year-old British girl passed through Turkish customs with a toy passport with gold teddy bears on the front that identified her as a unicorn. Her mother accidentally handed over the passport that the girl had made for her toy unicorn, and the customs offіcer accepted and stamped it
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TIL Ants sleep by taking about 250 one minute naps throughout their day. It totals just under 5 hours of sleep. This allows for 80% of their colony to be awake, working and prepared at any given moment.
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TIL Jerry Seinfeld is banned from the New York soup stall that he used for the basis of The Soup Nazi episode of Seinfeld. Weeks after the episode aired, Seinfeld went in for lunch, and chef Al Yeganeh asked him to leave, unhappy with the moniker the show had given him.
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dataisbeautiful

[OC] Numerical Simulation of Traffic Jam Formation
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[OC] types of alcoholic beverages consumed in terms of pure alcohol content by country, 2018
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[OC] By applying a collector's curve to large marine animals (>2m) I’ve determined that there are six sea monsters left to discover. Video explanation and sources in comments.
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Cooking

My cooking challenge of 2020 : ended up making 150 different recipes from 114 different countries.
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I have plain vanilla ice cream in the freezer. What ice cream toppings can I make quickly out of ordinary ingredients?
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Eggs-hate them but I want to like them
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food

[Homemade] Brioche Doughnuts
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[Homemade] Smoked Beef Back Ribs
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My take on Tonkotsu Ramen with spicy umami bomb. [homemade]
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movies

New images of Dave Bautista and the cast of Zack Snyder's 'Army of the Dead' - A group of mercenaries plot a heist on a Las Vegas casino during a zombie outbreak.
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Ray Fisher’s Cyborg Written Out of ‘The Flash'; Role Won’t Be Recast
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Netflix’s next big science fiction movie is set to debut next week: Outside the Wire, a military science fiction thriller starring Damson Idris as a soldier assigned to assist a classified military robot (played by Anthony Mackie) in a war zone.
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Art

If I can't have her... , Adam the Creator, Digital, 2021
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Trump-O-Matic, Mark Bryan, Oil on Canvas, 2016
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United Screams of America, Me, 2021
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television

Stephen Colbert's Live Monologue for Jan. 6, 2021
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Aziz Ansari's Master Of None to return. Season three to be shot in London
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WandaVision has been officially rated TV-PG
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pics

How it started and how it ended
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Domestic Terrorism
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The Capitol police removes disabled people as they protest healthcare changes, in 2017.
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gifs

Police letting Trump rioters into Capitol
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A relaxing bath for a stressful times
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BBQ
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educationalgifs

A great white shark may grow and use 20,000+ teeth in its lifetime. Also, it has 5 rows of teeth at any given time & will never run out of teeth because if one is lost, another spins forward from a coil-like tooth reservoir of backup teeth in the jaw and spins forward to replace the old one.
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mildlyinteresting

This McDonalds hasn't been renovated since the 80's/90's.
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Two toned deer I saw this morning
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I found a cake vending machine
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interestingasfuck

During the four years of the Civil War, Ft. Stevens was the closest the confederates got to Washington. During the insurrection on the US Capitol building today, supporters of Donald Trump carried the confederate battle flag through the Capitol as they committed attempted sedition.
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The door to the dining area of the Alcobaça Monastery in Portugal was made narrow so that monks who got too fat were forced to go into fasting.
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Street artist Kevin Lee called his work "the invisibility of poverty".
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funny

My little sister bought accessories for her cat. This is the result. Thug Lyfe
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Giddy up!
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How are we feeling today?
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aww

My mum made this for me!
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I present to you the best dance move the turtle shake
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Kitten focusing on the important stuff
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Random Subreddit of the day: asexuality

These are its 3 top posts of all time:
I’m 62. It’s time.
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this is so much better
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Representation matters
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submitted by _call-me-al_ to RedditTLDR [link] [comments]

Reddit Chosen Oscars: 1995 Winners

Best Picture
1. Toy Story
2. Seven
3. Before Sunrise
4. Apollo 13
5. The Usual Suspects
6. Braveheart
6. Heat
8. Casino
9. Babe
10. 12 Monkeys
Best Director
  1. David Fincher for Seven
  2. Ron Howard for Apollo 13
  3. Mel Gibson for Braveheart
  4. Michael Mann for Heat
  5. Richard Linklater for Before Sunrise
Best Lead Actor
  1. Nicolas Cage as Ben Sanderson in Leaving Las Vegas
  2. Ethan Hawke as Jesse in Before Sunrise
  3. Morgan Freeman as William Somerset in Seven
  4. Tom Hanks as Jim Lovell in Apollo 13
  5. Sean Penn as Matthew Poncelet in Dead Man Walking
Best Lead Actress
1. Julie Delpy as Céline in Before Sunrise
2. Sharon Stone as Ginger McKenna in Casino
3. Susan Sarandon as Sister Helen Prejean in Dead Man Walking
4. Nicole Kidman as Suzanne Stone-Maretto in To Die For
4. Elisabeth Shue as Sera in Leaving Las Vegas
6. Emma Thompson as Elinor Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility
Best Supporting Actor
  1. Kevin Spacey as Roger "Verbal" Kint/Keyser Söze in The Usual Suspects
  2. Brad Pitt as Jeffrey Goines in 12 Monkeys
  3. Ed Harris as Gene Kranz in Apollo 13
  4. James Cromwell as Arthur Hoggett in Babe
  5. Joe Pesci as Nicky Santoro in Casino
Best Supporting Actress
  1. Kate Winslet as Marianne Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility
  2. Gwyneth Paltrow as Tracy Mills in Seven
  3. Mira Sorvino as Linda Ash in Mighty Aphrodite
  4. Kathleen Quinlan as Marilyn Gerlach Lovell in Apollo 13
  5. Joan Allen as Pat Nixon in Nixon
Best Original Screenplay
  1. Toy Story
  2. Seven
  3. Before Sunrise
  4. The Usual Suspects
  5. La Haine
Best Adapted Screenplay
1. 12 Monkeys
2. Casino
3. Apollo 13
4. Babe
4. Sense and Sensibility
6. Leaving Las Vegas
Best Animated Film
1. Toy Story
2. Ghost in the Shell
3. Pocahontas
3. Whisper of the Heart
5. A Goofy Movie
Best Non-English Language Film
  1. La Haine
  2. Ghost in the Shell
  3. Il Postino: The Postman
  4. Whisper of the Heart
  5. Underground
Best Documentary Film
  1. A Personal Journey with Martin Scorsese Through American Movies
  2. The Battle Over Citizen Kane
  3. Anne Frank Remembered
  4. Frank and Ollie
  5. Unzipped
Best Original Score
  1. Toy Story
  2. Braveheart
  3. Apollo 13
  4. Seven
  5. Sense and Sensibility
Best Original Song
  1. "You’ve Got a Friend in Me" from Toy Story
  2. "Colors of the Wind" from Pocahontas
  3. "Gangsta’s Paradise" from Dangerous Minds
  4. "GoldenEye" from GoldenEye
  5. "Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Kill Me" from Batman Forever
Best Sound
  1. Apollo 13
  2. Heat
  3. Toy Story
  4. Braveheart
  5. Seven
Best Production Design
  1. Braveheart
  2. Apollo 13
  3. Seven
  4. 12 Monkeys
  5. Sense and Sensibility
Best Cinematography
  1. Seven
  2. Braveheart
  3. Apollo 13
  4. Heat
  5. Casino
Best Makeup/Hairstyling
1. Braveheart
2. Batman Forever
2. Seven
4. Clueless
5. 12 Monkeys
Best Costume Design
  1. Braveheart
  2. Sense and Sensibility
  3. Clueless
  4. Casino
  5. 12 Monkeys
Best Editing
  1. Seven
  2. Apollo 13
  3. Heat
  4. Casino
  5. Braveheart
Best Visual Effects
  1. Apollo 13
  2. Toy Story
  3. Babe
  4. Jumanji
  5. Batman Forever
Best Voice Acting Performance
  1. Tom Hanks as Woody in Toy Story
  2. Tim Allen as Buzz Lightyear in Toy Story
  3. Christine Cavanaugh as Babe in Babe
  4. Bill Farmer as Goofy in A Goofy Movie
  5. Irene Bedard and Judy Kuhn as Pocahontas in Pocahontas
Best Directorial Debut
  1. John Lasseter for Toy Story
  2. Noah Baumbach for Kicking and Screaming
  3. F. Gary Gray for Friday
  4. Michael Bay for Bad Boys
  5. Larry Clark for Kids
Best Ensemble Cast
  1. The Usual Suspects
  2. Seven
  3. Apollo 13
  4. Heat
  5. Casino
Best Choreography, Stunts or Dance
  1. Braveheart
  2. Heat
  3. GoldenEye
  4. Rumble in the Bronx
  5. Apollo 13
Best Soundtrack
  1. Toy Story
  2. Pocahontas
  3. Casino
  4. Clueless
  5. Batman Forever
Best Non-English Language Performance
  1. Vincent Cassel as Vinz in La Haine
  2. Massimo Troisi as Mario Ruoppolo in Il Postino: The Postman
  3. Gong Li as Xiao Jinbao in Shanghai Triad
  4. Isabelle Huppert as Jeanne in La Ceremonie
  5. Miki Manojlović as Marko Dren in Underground
Preferential ballot for this year
Full charts for all the categories
submitted by JuanRiveara to oscarrace [link] [comments]

Reddit Chosen Oscars: 1995 Winners

Best Picture
1. Toy Story
2. Seven
3. Before Sunrise
4. Apollo 13
5. The Usual Suspects
6. Braveheart
6. Heat
8. Casino
9. Babe
10. 12 Monkeys
Best Director
  1. David Fincher for Seven
  2. Ron Howard for Apollo 13
  3. Mel Gibson for Braveheart
  4. Michael Mann for Heat
  5. Richard Linklater for Before Sunrise
Best Lead Actor
  1. Nicolas Cage as Ben Sanderson in Leaving Las Vegas
  2. Ethan Hawke as Jesse in Before Sunrise
  3. Morgan Freeman as William Somerset in Seven
  4. Tom Hanks as Jim Lovell in Apollo 13
  5. Sean Penn as Matthew Poncelet in Dead Man Walking
Best Lead Actress
1. Julie Delpy as Céline in Before Sunrise
2. Sharon Stone as Ginger McKenna in Casino
3. Susan Sarandon as Sister Helen Prejean in Dead Man Walking
4. Nicole Kidman as Suzanne Stone-Maretto in To Die For
4. Elisabeth Shue as Sera in Leaving Las Vegas
6. Emma Thompson as Elinor Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility
Best Supporting Actor
  1. Kevin Spacey as Roger "Verbal" Kint/Keyser Söze in The Usual Suspects
  2. Brad Pitt as Jeffrey Goines in 12 Monkeys
  3. Ed Harris as Gene Kranz in Apollo 13
  4. James Cromwell as Arthur Hoggett in Babe
  5. Joe Pesci as Nicky Santoro in Casino
Best Supporting Actress
  1. Kate Winslet as Marianne Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility
  2. Gwyneth Paltrow as Tracy Mills in Seven
  3. Mira Sorvino as Linda Ash in Mighty Aphrodite
  4. Kathleen Quinlan as Marilyn Gerlach Lovell in Apollo 13
  5. Joan Allen as Pat Nixon in Nixon
Best Original Screenplay
  1. Toy Story
  2. Seven
  3. Before Sunrise
  4. The Usual Suspects
  5. La Haine
Best Adapted Screenplay
1. 12 Monkeys
2. Casino
3. Apollo 13
4. Babe
4. Sense and Sensibility
6. Leaving Las Vegas
Best Animated Film
1. Toy Story
2. Ghost in the Shell
3. Pocahontas
3. Whisper of the Heart
5. A Goofy Movie
Best Non-English Language Film
  1. La Haine
  2. Ghost in the Shell
  3. Il Postino: The Postman
  4. Whisper of the Heart
  5. Underground
Best Documentary Film
  1. A Personal Journey with Martin Scorsese Through American Movies
  2. The Battle Over Citizen Kane
  3. Anne Frank Remembered
  4. Frank and Ollie
  5. Unzipped
Best Original Score
  1. Toy Story
  2. Braveheart
  3. Apollo 13
  4. Seven
  5. Sense and Sensibility
Best Original Song
  1. "You’ve Got a Friend in Me" from Toy Story
  2. "Colors of the Wind" from Pocahontas
  3. "Gangsta’s Paradise" from Dangerous Minds
  4. "GoldenEye" from GoldenEye
  5. "Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Kill Me" from Batman Forever
Best Sound
  1. Apollo 13
  2. Heat
  3. Toy Story
  4. Braveheart
  5. Seven
Best Production Design
  1. Braveheart
  2. Apollo 13
  3. Seven
  4. 12 Monkeys
  5. Sense and Sensibility
Best Cinematography
  1. Seven
  2. Braveheart
  3. Apollo 13
  4. Heat
  5. Casino
Best Makeup/Hairstyling
1. Braveheart
2. Batman Forever
2. Seven
4. Clueless
5. 12 Monkeys
Best Costume Design
  1. Braveheart
  2. Sense and Sensibility
  3. Clueless
  4. Casino
  5. 12 Monkeys
Best Editing
  1. Seven
  2. Apollo 13
  3. Heat
  4. Casino
  5. Braveheart
Best Visual Effects
  1. Apollo 13
  2. Toy Story
  3. Babe
  4. Jumanji
  5. Batman Forever
Best Voice Acting Performance
  1. Tom Hanks as Woody in Toy Story
  2. Tim Allen as Buzz Lightyear in Toy Story
  3. Christine Cavanaugh as Babe in Babe
  4. Bill Farmer as Goofy in A Goofy Movie
  5. Irene Bedard and Judy Kuhn as Pocahontas in Pocahontas
Best Directorial Debut
  1. John Lasseter for Toy Story
  2. Noah Baumbach for Kicking and Screaming
  3. F. Gary Gray for Friday
  4. Michael Bay for Bad Boys
  5. Larry Clark for Kids
Best Ensemble Cast
  1. The Usual Suspects
  2. Seven
  3. Apollo 13
  4. Heat
  5. Casino
Best Choreography, Stunts or Dance
  1. Braveheart
  2. Heat
  3. GoldenEye
  4. Rumble in the Bronx
  5. Apollo 13
Best Soundtrack
  1. Toy Story
  2. Pocahontas
  3. Casino
  4. Clueless
  5. Batman Forever
Best Non-English Language Performance
  1. Vincent Cassel as Vinz in La Haine
  2. Massimo Troisi as Mario Ruoppolo in Il Postino: The Postman
  3. Gong Li as Xiao Jinbao in Shanghai Triad
  4. Isabelle Huppert as Jeanne in La Ceremonie
  5. Miki Manojlović as Marko Dren in Underground
Preferential ballot for this year
Full charts for all the categories
submitted by JuanRiveara to Oscars [link] [comments]

I got a 2 on the blacklist

Overall Rating
2/10
Published
06-05-20
Premise
3/10
Plot
2/10
Character
2/10
Dialogue
2/10
Setting
4/10
Era 2000s
Locations Vegas, miscellaneous small, unnamed towns across the country
Budgets Low
Genre Action & Adventure, Romantic Adventure, Western, Modern Western
Logline When Jolene meets a mysterious man, she falls in love and finds herself swept into his dangerous and thrilling world.
Strengths This is a nice twist on a hero (or villain's) origin story. Jolene’s progression from a meek, ordinary woman to a legendary savior is set up well. Seeing Jolene become a character from one of the Westerns she loved so much as a child is empowering and exciting. Jolene’s solo journey in particular is a strength of this script. The visuals are vibrant and engaging and it’s clear that Jolene is going on something of an emotional and spiritual journey, as well as a physical one. It’s powerful. The choice to include moments of voice over dialogue from Jeff, Jolene, and finally from Juan is interesting and unique. It’s a bold decision that feels stylistic and informative in an original way. Similarly, the focus on music is a nice touchstone for the script.
Weaknesses The core issue with this script is the question of why Jolene would trust this man after he insists she dance with him and then literally breaks into her home. In order for this film to work, readers need to share Jolene’s intrigue and understand her attraction, at least on some level. Currently, her motivations are unclear and her actions are baffling. Jeff seems unsafe and scary. His actions aren’t charming or romantic; they’re creepy and illegal. Unfortunately, women are conditioned to look out for themselves in situations exactly like the one with Jeff. It’s nearly impossible to believe that Jolene, nor any woman, would put herself in such a vulnerable situation. There’s also the question of why Jeff and Jolene would spend their time in casinos or in dance halls if they know that Jeff is in danger and being hunted. Surely it would make more sense to escape to safety instead of risking death to sing karaoke? In general, the plot lacks forward movement. Once Jolene agrees to travel with Jeff, both characters talk a lot about being in danger and being afraid, but there’s little actual action in the script's first half.
Prospects: Because Jolene's arc is empowering by the end, it's possible that a talented actress could provide this script with a path to the screen. However, Jeff's character and Jolene's initial reasons for trusting him would likely need to be addressed before moving forward.
Pages 92
So, it turns out you guys who were giving me a hard time were right. I got one more evaluation coming, but I'm expecting mostly the same.
You know what though? I want to keep on working at it. I have two different screenplay projects I want to write, before but what I think I'm going to do is spend some more time reading professional screenplays.
Then when I'm done I'm going to give this baby a good hard rewrite.
submitted by jtin1022 to Screenwriting [link] [comments]

Just rewatched Jackie Brown... I personally think it is Tarantino’s best movie.

Among all of Tarantino’s work, I feel like Jackie Brown always flies under the radar. After Once Upon A Time came out, I looked at lots of people ranking Tarantino films and Jackie Brown always seemed to be low. After rewatching it, I cannot understand why.
This is the only Tarantino movie with an adapted screenplay, from Elmore Leonard’s Rum Punch, and I believe the movie benefits from it. A lot of Tarantino movies to me feel like a bunch of great scenes stitched together, whereas this movie has much more of a plot consistently present. It feels a lot more oriented towards reaching an end goal.
I also love the way this movie is about old people. At its root, it’s a movie about old people falling in love. It’s something you don’t really see in A-list movies (apart from the Irishman which was also about old people). The romance between Jackie and Max Cherry always seems believable, and it truly feels like it could be each character’s last chance of finding love. Robert Forster brings a real honestly to the Max character, which adds a lot to their romance.
The acting is really good too. Everybody shines in their roles. The first time I watched this movie, I felt like De Niro was wasted. Watching it again, I thought he was great. It’s such a departure from the roles he usually played around the late 90s, coming off of Ronin, Casino, and Heat. He fits the role of a stoner lazy guy well past his prime so well in his limited screen time. His whole interaction with Melanie towards the end of the film is great. SLJ is great too, and I loved how menacing he was despite the stakes in the movie not being too high. Yeah, $500K is a lot of money, but at the end of the day, his character isn’t as big of a deal as he thinks he is.
All in all, I have almost no complaints with this movie. The pacing feels good throughout, the soundtrack is great (esp Across 110th St), the acting is great, and the dialogue still feels sharp as it is written by Tarantino. Anybody else feel this way and think it should be higher rated? I think maybe people expected something crazier or grander when this came out, as it was Tarantino’s first movie after Pulp Fiction.
Last thing: I really enjoy movies based on Elmore Leonard novels. Get Shorty with John Travolta is really good. And I really recommend Out of Sight, starring George Clooney and JLo, directed by Steven Soderbergh. That movie is so much fun and has all the hallmarks of a Soderbergh movie.
submitted by KillerKatz007 to movies [link] [comments]

Reddit Chosen Oscars: 2000s Decade Winners

Best Picture
  1. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
  2. The Dark Knight
  3. Inglourious Basterds
  4. There Will Be Blood
  5. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
  6. WALL•E
  7. No Country for Old Men
  8. The Departed
  9. Pan’s Labyrinth
  10. Brokeback Mountain
Best Director
  1. Peter Jackson for The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
  2. Paul Thomas Anderson for There Will Be Blood
  3. Alfonso Cuarón for Children of Men
  4. Joel Coen and Ethan Coen for No Country for Old Men
  5. Quentin Tarantino for Inglourious Basterds
Best Lead Actor
  1. Daniel Day-Lewis as Daniel Plainview in There Will Be Blood
  2. Christian Bale as Patrick Bateman in American Psycho
  3. Jim Carrey as Joel Barish in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
  4. Johnny Depp as Captain Jack Sparrow in Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl
  5. Heath Ledger as Ennis Del Mar in Brokeback Mountain
  6. Philip Seymour Hoffman as Truman Capote in Capote
Best Lead Actress
1. Kate Winslet as Clementine Kruczynski in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
2. Ellen Burstyn as Sara Goldfarb in Requiem for a Dream
2. Charlize Theron as Aileen Wuornos in Monster
4. Uma Thurman as the Bride in Kill Bill: Volume 1
5. Naomi Watts as Betty Elms/Diane Selwyn in Mulholland Drive
Best Supporting Actor
  1. Heath Ledger as the Joker in The Dark Knight
  2. Christoph Waltz as Hans Landa in Inglourious Basterds
  3. Javier Bardem as Anton Chigurh in No Country for Old Men
  4. Jake Gyllenhaal as Jack Twist in Brokeback Mountain
  5. Paul Dano as Paul Sunday and Eli Sunday in There Will Be Blood
Best Supporting Actress
  1. Cate Blanchett as Katherine Hepburn in The Aviator
  2. Rachel McAdams as Regina George in Mean Girls
  3. Diane Kruger as Bridget von Hammersmark in Inglourious Basterds
  4. Catherine Zeta-Jones as Velma Kelly in Chicago
  5. Saoirse Ronan as Briony Tallis in Atonement
  6. Michelle Williams as Alma Beers Del Mar in Brokeback Mountain
Best Original Screenplay
  1. Inglourious Basterds
  2. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
  3. Memento
  4. Spirited Away
  5. Pan’s Labyrinth
Best Adapted Screenplay
  1. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
  2. No Country for Old Men
  3. There Will Be Blood
  4. Before Sunset
  5. The Departed
  6. Brokeback Mountain
Best Animated Film
  1. Spirited Away
  2. WALL•E
  3. The Incredibles
  4. Ratatouille
  5. Finding Nemo
Best Non-English Language Movie
  1. Spirited Away
  2. Pan’s Labyrinth
  3. Oldboy
  4. City of God
  5. Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
Best Documentary Film
  1. Man on Wire
  2. Bowling for Columbine
  3. March of the Penguins
  4. An Inconvenient Truth
  5. Fahrenheit 9/11
Best Original Score
  1. Up
  2. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
  3. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
  4. The Dark Knight
  5. There Will Be Blood
Best Original Song
  1. "Lose Yourself" from 8 Mile
  2. "You Know My Name" from Casino Royale
  3. "Falling Slowly" from Once
  4. "Into the West" from The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
  5. "Jai Ho" from Slumdog Millionaire
Best Sound
  1. The Dark Knight
  2. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
  3. Children of Men
  4. WALL•E
  5. The Hurt Locker
Best Production Design
  1. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
  2. Pan’s Labyrinth
  3. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
  4. There Will Be Blood
  5. The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers
Best Cinematography
  1. Children of Men
  2. There Will Be Blood
  3. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
  4. No Country for Old Men
  5. Pan’s Labyrinth
Best Makeup/Hairstyling
  1. Pan’s Labyrinth
  2. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
  3. The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
  4. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
  5. The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers
Best Costume Design
1. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
2. Chicago
2. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
4. Moulin Rouge!
5. The Devil Wears Prada
6. Pan’s Labyrinth
Best Editing
1. Memento
2. Hot Fuzz
3. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
3. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
5. No Country for Old Men
Best Visual Effects
  1. Avatar
  2. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
  3. Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest
  4. The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers
  5. The Curious Case of Benjamin Burton
Best Voice Acting/Motion Capture Performance
1. Andy Serkis as Gollum in The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
2. Andy Serkis as Gollum in The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers
3. Eddie Murphy as Donkey in Shrek
4. Pablo Adán and Doug Jones as the Faun in Pan’s Labyrinth
4. Ellen Degeneres as Dory in Finding Nemo
Best Directorial Debut
  1. Edgar Wright for Shaun of the Dead
  2. Martin McDonagh for In Bruges
  3. Neill Blomkamp for District 9
  4. Rob Marshall for Chicago
  5. Pete Docter for Monsters, Inc.
Best Ensemble Cast
  1. Inglourious Basterds
  2. The Departed
  3. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
  4. Chicago
  5. No Country for Old Men
Best Choreography, Stunts or Dance
  1. Kill Bill: Volume 1
  2. Casino Royale
  3. Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
  4. Chicago
  5. Oldboy
Best Soundtrack
  1. O Brother, Where Art Thou?
  2. Kill Bill: Volume 1
  3. Chicago
  4. School of Rock
  5. Moulin Rouge!
Best Non-English Language Performance
1. Audrey Tautou as Amélie Poulain in Amélie
2. Marion Cotillard as Édith Piaf in La Vie en Rose
2. Choi Min-sik as Oh Dae-su in Oldboy
4. Ivana Baquero as Ofelia/Princess Moanna in Pan’s Labyrinth
5. Michelle Yeoh as Yu Shu Lien in Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
Full charts for all the categories
submitted by JuanRiveara to Oscars [link] [comments]

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submitted by MedwedianPresident_X to Fun [link] [comments]

[FOR SALE] Because The Internet, Several VMP and Limited Variants (Perfume Genius, Altopalo, Texas Sun, Boygenius, Arctic Monkeys, Jackboys, Blossom Dearie, El-P)

I’m thinning out some of my collection, and selling some items that may find homes where they’ll actually get spun!
These are all M/NM and sealed unless otherwise indicated. Add $5 for shipping within the U.S. If you’re outside the U.S., I’ll have to pull out my calculator for shipping. PM to make an offer.
Childish Gambino - Because The Internet (Limited 2LP with Screenplay) - Played once through, NM/NM- condition - $175
Altopalo - Farawayfromeveryoneyouknow (VMP #264/300 light blue) - Sealed - $45
Perfume Genius - Set My Heart On Fire Immediately (VMP #586/750 coke bottle clear) - Sealed - $65
El-P - I’ll Sleep When You’re Dead (VMP red/black marble) - Sealed - $35
[SOLD] Jim Sullivan - UFO (VMP coke bottle clear) - Sealed - $25
Experience Unlimited - Free Yourself (VMP) (incredible mix by Bernie Grundman) - Sealed - $25
Blossom Dearie - S/T (VMP) - Sealed - $35
[SOLD] Leon Bridges and Khruangbin- Texas Sun (Limited Purple Nebula) - Sealed - $40
[SOLD] Arctic Monkeys - Tranquility Base Hotel + Casino (Limited Deluxe Gold) - Sealed - $55
[SOLD] Boygenius - S/T (Limited Translucent Red) - Sealed - $30
Jackboys- Jackboys (UO Limited Neon Yellow) - Sealed - (1 cm faint seam split on spine of cover) - $26
submitted by ohhellojones to VinylCollectors [link] [comments]

Reddit Chosen Oscars: 2000s Decade Winners

Best Picture
  1. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
  2. The Dark Knight
  3. Inglourious Basterds
  4. There Will Be Blood
  5. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
  6. WALL•E
  7. No Country for Old Men
  8. The Departed
  9. Pan’s Labyrinth
  10. Brokeback Mountain
Best Director
  1. Peter Jackson for The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
  2. Paul Thomas Anderson for There Will Be Blood
  3. Alfonso Cuarón for Children of Men
  4. Joel Coen and Ethan Coen for No Country for Old Men
  5. Quentin Tarantino for Inglourious Basterds
Best Lead Actor
  1. Daniel Day-Lewis as Daniel Plainview in There Will Be Blood
  2. Christian Bale as Patrick Bateman in American Psycho
  3. Jim Carrey as Joel Barish in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
  4. Johnny Depp as Captain Jack Sparrow in Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl
  5. Heath Ledger as Ennis Del Mar in Brokeback Mountain
  6. Philip Seymour Hoffman as Truman Capote in Capote
Best Lead Actress
1. Kate Winslet as Clementine Kruczynski in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
2. Ellen Burstyn as Sara Goldfarb in Requiem for a Dream
2. Charlize Theron as Aileen Wuornos in Monster
4. Uma Thurman as the Bride in Kill Bill: Volume 1
5. Naomi Watts as Betty Elms/Diane Selwyn in Mulholland Drive
Best Supporting Actor
  1. Heath Ledger as the Joker in The Dark Knight
  2. Christoph Waltz as Hans Landa in Inglourious Basterds
  3. Javier Bardem as Anton Chigurh in No Country for Old Men
  4. Jake Gyllenhaal as Jack Twist in Brokeback Mountain
  5. Paul Dano as Paul Sunday and Eli Sunday in There Will Be Blood
Best Supporting Actress
  1. Cate Blanchett as Katherine Hepburn in The Aviator
  2. Rachel McAdams as Regina George in Mean Girls
  3. Diane Kruger as Bridget von Hammersmark in Inglourious Basterds
  4. Catherine Zeta-Jones as Velma Kelly in Chicago
  5. Saoirse Ronan as Briony Tallis in Atonement
  6. Michelle Williams as Alma Beers Del Mar in Brokeback Mountain
Best Original Screenplay
  1. Inglourious Basterds
  2. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
  3. Memento
  4. Spirited Away
  5. Pan’s Labyrinth
Best Adapted Screenplay
  1. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
  2. No Country for Old Men
  3. There Will Be Blood
  4. Before Sunset
  5. The Departed
  6. Brokeback Mountain
Best Animated Film
  1. Spirited Away
  2. WALL•E
  3. The Incredibles
  4. Ratatouille
  5. Finding Nemo
Best Non-English Language Movie
  1. Spirited Away
  2. Pan’s Labyrinth
  3. Oldboy
  4. City of God
  5. Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
Best Documentary Film
  1. Man on Wire
  2. Bowling for Columbine
  3. March of the Penguins
  4. An Inconvenient Truth
  5. Fahrenheit 9/11
Best Original Score
  1. Up
  2. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
  3. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
  4. The Dark Knight
  5. There Will Be Blood
Best Original Song
  1. "Lose Yourself" from 8 Mile
  2. "You Know My Name" from Casino Royale
  3. "Falling Slowly" from Once
  4. "Into the West" from The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
  5. "Jai Ho" from Slumdog Millionaire
Best Sound
  1. The Dark Knight
  2. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
  3. Children of Men
  4. WALL•E
  5. The Hurt Locker
Best Production Design
  1. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
  2. Pan’s Labyrinth
  3. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
  4. There Will Be Blood
  5. The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers
Best Cinematography
  1. Children of Men
  2. There Will Be Blood
  3. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
  4. No Country for Old Men
  5. Pan’s Labyrinth
Best Makeup/Hairstyling
  1. Pan’s Labyrinth
  2. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
  3. The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
  4. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
  5. The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers
Best Costume Design
1. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
2. Chicago
2. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
4. Moulin Rouge!
5. The Devil Wears Prada
6. Pan’s Labyrinth
Best Editing
1. Memento
2. Hot Fuzz
3. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
3. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
5. No Country for Old Men
Best Visual Effects
  1. Avatar
  2. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
  3. Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest
  4. The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers
  5. The Curious Case of Benjamin Burton
Best Voice Acting/Motion Capture Performance
1. Andy Serkis as Gollum in The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
2. Andy Serkis as Gollum in The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers
3. Eddie Murphy as Donkey in Shrek
4. Pablo Adán and Doug Jones as the Faun in Pan’s Labyrinth
4. Ellen Degeneres as Dory in Finding Nemo
Best Directorial Debut
  1. Edgar Wright for Shaun of the Dead
  2. Martin McDonagh for In Bruges
  3. Neill Blomkamp for District 9
  4. Rob Marshall for Chicago
  5. Pete Docter for Monsters, Inc.
Best Ensemble Cast
  1. Inglourious Basterds
  2. The Departed
  3. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
  4. Chicago
  5. No Country for Old Men
Best Choreography, Stunts or Dance
  1. Kill Bill: Volume 1
  2. Casino Royale
  3. Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
  4. Chicago
  5. Oldboy
Best Soundtrack
  1. O Brother, Where Art Thou?
  2. Kill Bill: Volume 1
  3. Chicago
  4. School of Rock
  5. Moulin Rouge!
Best Non-English Language Performance
1. Audrey Tautou as Amélie Poulain in Amélie
2. Marion Cotillard as Édith Piaf in La Vie en Rose
2. Choi Min-sik as Oh Dae-su in Oldboy
4. Ivana Baquero as Ofelia/Princess Moanna in Pan’s Labyrinth
5. Michelle Yeoh as Yu Shu Lien in Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
Full charts for all the categories
submitted by JuanRiveara to oscarrace [link] [comments]

You asked for it, here it is: Meeting McCarthy (1992)

Meeting McCarthy
by Garry Wallace
Southern Quarterly, 1992, 30(4), 134-139
In March of 1989, while traveling to El Paso with Betty Carey, I was afforded the opportunity of meeting Cormac McCarthy. Betty Carey, of Las Vegas World Series of Poker fame, was writing a book about her adventures as a professional gambler. She had arranged to meet with McCarthy to discuss her current writing, as well as to rendezvous with their common friend, Frank Morton, another gambler. What follows is my best recollection of the several conversations that took place over three days of our visit. I made no tape recording or notes during these informal, quite friendly talks, but wrote what I remembered in a journal after returning from El Paso. This account is recreated from chapters in my unpublished novel based on my year-long writing partnership with Betty Carey, and is as accurate as memory allows. Where I felt reasonable confident about actual words, I have used direct quotations. Elsewhere, I have paraphrased.
​On a bright spring Sunday morning, Betty and I awaited McCarthy in a quaint family restaurant on Mesa Avenue in El Paso, where Cormac suggested we meet to have brunch. Betty clutched a handkerchief to absorb the perspiration from her hands. She was nervous, as was I. Each time the entrance door opened, we glanced in anticipation. Finally a man, nondescript—medium build, short hair, a dull plaid shirt—walked down the short flight of stairs, his eyes searching the lower tier where we seated. It was Cormac McCarthy.
​Betty smiled and we got up to greet her friend. McCarthy asked about Betty’s book. He had been privy to her very first draft, written three years before. Her stories were about life as a gambler. For thirteen years she had won and lost fortunes, sitting at poker tables across the country with men like Jack Strauss and Amarillo Slim, risking life to hijackers, still able to spirit away tidy sums unknown to anyone but herself. Betty told McCarthy that so much had happened since that first draft that she was in the process of rewriting the whole story. Betty had allegedly been cheated in a Las Vegas casino scam. There were allegations of Gaming Commission and FBI coverups. Her case was then on appeal before the Nevada Supreme Court, ultimately to be thrown out because of the statute of limitations.
​She asked McCarthy if it was common for writers to do so much rewriting. He said he knew a few writers who would compose a hundred pages of a novel and then have to start over, but that he usually knew where his own novels were going from the start.
​Betty told McCarthy that she and I had written the screenplay of her story, and that ICM of Los Angeles had said it possessed some of the same appeal as Silkwood. She failed to mention that the agent had turned it down for being “awkwardly written,” because we’d portrayed Betty as an “arrogant and unsympathetic character,” and because “the authors seem inexperienced in mapping out dramatic framework.” She said, “I’m writing my book in a suspense format. I want it to be a best seller.”
​“I don’t read best sellers,” McCarthy said. Feeling responsible for the latest direction the book had taken, I explained, “What she means by ‘best seller’ is that she wants the facts of the casino scam to reach as many people as possible.” With a curt nod McCarthy indicated that he had understood that to be Betty’s meaning. He acted friendly yet cool toward me, a stranger.
​McCarthy asked if there was a particular author that Betty was patterning her novel after. I mentioned Ken Follett. McCarthy nodded and said that Follet (sic) was good. He mentioned also that Stephen King was a good writer. From his earlier comment on best sellers, I wasn’t sure if McCarthy had read these authors or if he was speaking from hearsay.
​“What do you read?” I asked. McCarthy said he read mostly nonfiction, although he did enjoy Hemingway. Betty and I had a conversation the day before with Irving Brown and his wife, proprietors of a used and rare book store on Mesa Avenue. An acquaintance of McCarthy as well as a professor of philosophy at the University of Texas, El Paso, Brown told us that McCarthy—an unpretentious man who often did his laundry right next door—considered Melville the greatest author, and that he read books about astronomy and physics. Brown especially liked the part in Suttree where Cornelius sees his reflection in the glass door and thinks, “Suttree and anti-Suttree.” Brown said that in his opinion McCarthy had over-read Plato.
​Betty mentioned how hard it was to find the time to write. When I said, “You have to be selfish,” McCarthy agreed, but substituted the word “ruthless.” Betty listed a few of the interruptions she had to put up with, eliciting McCarthy’s remark that he could write in a train station if he had to, but not if somebody kept asking for directions. McCarthy said that he wrote in the morning, every morning. “Why not write every day?” he asked rhetorically. “In the afternoon I visit friends. You can’t write all day long.”
​When Betty said she wished she could just run away from her obligations and be free to write, McCarthy recalled that once he had spent an entire year doing little more than playing pool with his friends.
​Betty and McCarthy talked about their lives, the consequences of their successes. Betty said that no more would she consent to interviews because so often they changed the story, often sensationalizing her life beyond reality. McCarthy agreed, saying that he would not do interviews.1 He told Betty that J. D. Salinger had given only one interview throughout his career as a novelist, to elementary children.
​“Do you teach?” I asked.
​Looking at me sternly, McCarthy said that he did not, and he seemed not to want to discuss it further. He mentioned an author, Robert Fulghum, who had published a somewhat humorous book about learning all you need to know by the time you graduate from kindergarten. McCarthy gave a few examples: “To tell the truth. Not to hit each other. To be fair.”
​Betty laughed. “I like that,” she said. From the things McCarthy said about academia, I understood him to believe that many of human beings’ problems arose from pursuits in education. In a later conversation about spiritual experiences, McCarthy said that education often got in the way of understanding. He added that in certain Eskimo cultures, art, of both high and low quality, was seen as good. Art was a personal expression. Nobody went around telling children how to do theirs differently.
​Betty said she felt different from most people in our society, that she was very much a loner and that her friends would not be considered mainstream. McCarthy referred to himself and Betty as “outlaws.” He gazed at her and said, “Look who we are. We’re desperate people.” They had both lived such uncommon lives that their spirits were easily kindred. I felt that my own life had been too sheltered.
​Again I asked McCarthy if he could recommend any good books or authors that a beginning writer should read. He said, “All great writers read all other great writers.” Upon further prodding, he mentioned several of John McFee’s books and The Song Lines by Bruce Chatwin. McCarthy said that he knew Larry McMurtry; because McCarthy loved the television movie “Lonesome Dove” so much, he said that he would never read the book.
​Betty mentioned her love of traveling and said that some people had suggested she write a book about her travels, or a how-to-on poker, and forget the nonsense about exposing the alleged casino scam that had cheated her out of many thousands of dollars. Betty asked about what she could and could not write about other people. McCarthy said that writers had great latitude in their writing and, on a question about other people’s ideas, said, “If you like it, use it.” I believe this came under the axiom that everything had already been written and that most ideas were neither unique in themselves nor original.
​Brunch ended and the coffee pot went dry. I picked up the bill. Betty and I drove the camper back to the motel with McCarthy following in his old beater. The exterior of his car had been sandblasted to the metal and touched up with primer paint. It looked prepped for the body shop. Even with my untrained ear, I could tell the engine ran well.
​At the motel Betty dug into her briefcase for her most recently drafted chapter, which she handed to McCarthy, apologizing for its not being typed. McCarthy said, “That’s all right. We’re friends. We do things like this for each other.”
​The next day, Betty and I met McCarthy at an out-of-the-way health food store that served frozen yogurt and sandwiches. We ordered at the counter and took seats at a small table next to the front window. After we were served, the conversation turned to writing. Betty asked which person it would be best to write her story in, and McCarthy said that was always a hard question to answer. He asked which person she felt most comfortable writing in, and Betty said that both the first and third had their benefits, but that she just couldn’t decide. She wanted McCarthy to tell her which to use, and he could not do that. He offered suggestions quite sparingly. To a question about how descriptive to make Betty’s book, McCarthy said that the point of most novels could be told in a paragraph. The reason they’re longer is so the author can tell a story. And he said, “Don’t ever treat your audience as if they’re stupid. Your reader is smart.”
​“Have you read Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying?” McCarthy asked. She had not. He explained that each chapter of the novel had been written in the first person from the perspective of each of the different characters. When he suggested that Betty might try something like that, I could see hopelessness on Betty’s face. She had been working on her book for over three years.
​McCarthy mentioned that Faulkner had written the novel during his spare moments while working on a manual labor job at night. He said that Faulkner had even used a wheelbarrow on which to compose the story. McCarthy said that Faulkner never expected the novel to become great, and that the novel had a certain amateurish quality that gave the book its great appeal. He said that Betty should not be overly concerned if her writing was not professional, and that she should try to retain the natural quality that her writing had, as that was often the mark of literature. Because Betty was having trouble getting the most recent draft of the novel started, McCarthy suggested that she could try writing the ending of her story first, then the beginning. He told her to get a tape recorder and tell her stories into a microphone and then play them back.
​Betty talked about the most recent developments of her story, but even with McCarthy she was hesitant to reveal many of the specifics. McCarthy became curious when Betty described the four levels by which she categorized poker players. She explained that the top two levels involved the reading of “tells” (short for “telegraphing”), and the ability to send out misleading “false tells.” She mentioned how she tested people by asking “set up” questions and viewing their responses. She would often ask questions to which she was sure a person would lie, and then remember what behaviors accompanied those responses.
​“Fascinating,” McCarthy said. “Do I have any tells?”
​Betty laughed and studied him more closely. “I haven’t noticed any yet.”
​That night, in a freak blizzard, Betty and I drove to a motel across town where Frank Morton was spending the night on his way home from Los Angeles. Frank was the classic itinerant gambler, as well as a somewhat unorthodox evangelist. He was the liaison who had initially brought McCarthy and Betty together.
​A tall man with graying hair, Frank spoke with a voice that was garbled with years of cigarette smoking, and his breathing was labored. I found him friendly and rather opinionated, but he would listen to your ideas if you could break into the stream of his talk.
​After McCarthy arrived, we all climbed into Frank’s car. The snow and sleet moved on, leaving a violent sand storm in its wake. Frank followed McCarthy’s directions to a Mexican restaurant, and by the time we got there, the wind had died. Frank talked on about the hate among the races in L.A., about people’s lack of trust and the general downfall of the human condition. Each of us added opinions now and then, but it was Frank who monopolized the conversation and filled the air with smoke. We were his congregation. McCarthy sat and listened, offering few observations of his own.
​Back at his motel room, Frank related a number of personal religious experiences that he had had over the years, pointing out the flaws in other people’s lack of faith. I challenged him, saying that one day science would understand these unexplained phenomena for what they really were.
​McCarthy commented that some cultures used drugs to enhance the spiritual experience, and that he had tried LSD before the drug was made illegal. He said that it had helped to open his eyes to these kinds of experiences. Betty recounted having seen the image of Christ on a bus while in Costa Rica. This had been at a time following the casino scam when Betty had been on the run. She said that her experience was as real as our sitting together in the motel room. It had not been a dream or hallucination.
​Always the skeptic, I said, “But how does that prove Christianity? Why not Buddha or Allah? You saw Jesus because you were raised in Jesus-land.” I looked to Frank and McCarthy. Their expressions were sympathetic.
​McCarthy was slumped into one of the chairs with his left leg slung over the arm rest. He appeared a very patient listener. He said that he felt sorry for me because I was unable to grasp this concept of spiritual experience. He said that people all over the world, in every religion, were familiar with this experience. He asked if I’d ever read William James’s The Varieties of Religious Experience. I had not. His attitude seemed to indicate that in this book were the answers to many of the questions posed during our evening discussion. I was nonplussed. ​ ​“Truth,” McCarthy said about what writers must accomplish in their writing.
​“But what exactly is truth?” I asked.
​“Truth,” he repeated, his implications tacit.
​The next morning, Betty and I were at the motel when McCarthy arrived to go over his response to Betty’s chapter. He had written his critique on separate, smaller pieces of paper. Point by point, he went over his comments, offering occasional praise while not sparing the rod. Afterwards, I listed the three qualities I believed necessary for a person to become a successful writher: “To read a lot. To write a lot. To experience a lot.” McCarthy said that we all had experience enough from which to write.
​Months after our visit, I wrote McCarthy, completing a few thoughts I’d been unable to that night we discussed spiritual experiences. Some time later, I received his reply.
​He said that the religious experience is always described through the symbols of a particular culture and thus is somewhat misrepresented by them. He indicated that even the religious person is often uncomfortable with such experiences and accounts of them, and that those who have not had a religious experience cannot comprehend it through second-hand accounts, even good ones like James’s Varieties of Religious Experience. He went on to say that he thinks the mystical experience is a direct apprehension of reality, unmediated by symbol, and he ended with the thought that our inability to see spiritual truth is the greater mystery.
NOTES
1 He has recently made an exception to this rule, granting an interview to the Richard B. Woodward of the New York Times Magazine on the occasion of the publication of All the Pretty Horses. My account of our visit with McCarthy, neither intended nor conducted as an interview, is published here with his knowledge.
submitted by Energumen32 to cormacmccarthy [link] [comments]

The BL thinks my movie What Happens in Reno is slightly better this week than last week

Interesting last week to get a 5 on my first-ever screenplay. Interesting set of critiques -- the first one was so badly written and didn't even seem like the person had read my script, so I got a new one, another five , and that second one was pretty critical but in a different way.
Just now I got that second eval and it was a 6 and kind of different.
I also recently got a 7 on my second script (Revenge Plot) and I'm waiting for the second eval on that.
Now, yesterday I received freelance 'professional coverage' from someone I found on Fiverr. Now, THAT was very useful. I got the standard sort of 'coverage worksheet recommendation' thing as if it had been done by a production company employee, I got two-page overview/analysis, I got a logline, a synopsis, and something really great -- notes written on the actual script about formatting, plots points, dialogue, whatever the person thought of while reading.
So, the Fiverr package did what I know the BL doesn't do -- it really dug in and analyzed everything about the script page-by-page in a very no-holds-barred way. Incredibly helpful. I don't think I agree with every opinion, but most of it just seemed right on.

Going forward, if I DO submit a script to the BL again, it will NOT be until after I've had the more in-depth "coverage' done and made improvements based on that. I"m new to all this and learning as I go. Pretty fun all around, I'm enjoying the work and the learning process very much.

Overall Rating

6/10

Published

07-02-20

Premise

6/10

Plot

4/10

Character

5/10

Dialogue

5/10

Setting

5/10

Era
Present Day
Locations
Parking Structure, Casino
Budgets
Low
Genre
Drama, Crime Drama, Mystery & Suspense, Crime Thriller
Logline
When an alcoholic inherits some money, he travels to Reno to gamble and is pursued by his wife, who wants the money for plastic surgery; a brutally violent criminal who needs the money to appease the IRS and avoid prison; and his stepson, who is under the criminal's thrall.
Strengths
The ingredients are here for a twisty (and twisted) crime thriller, with three potentially interesting characters driven by the need or desire for inherited money. Matt, Hunter, Tanner, and Lydia are distinct and memorable, with dramatically promising relationships. The story moves quickly and is vivid in its brutality. A scene involving a man's eye imprints itself on the memory, and a climactic killing packs a punch.
Weaknesses
The story could better cohere. Hunter's motive is clear, his actions comprehensible, but Matt, Lydia, and Tanner's behavior feels mystifying at times. For example, Lydia's relationship with Hunter could be more clearly defined; sometimes she seems genuinely into him, sometimes it feels like she's been forced into the relationship, and her true feelings for Matt feel sketched in. Tanner could be developed in more three-dimensional detail, which would add more drama to his choice at the end. It's too unclear why Matt - who is revealed to be a novice - would want to gamble the money away. There's room to make the relationships more tangled and complex (for example, Lydia's relationship with her son feels vaguely defined here and could be further developed). The timeline, though labeled, tends to be confusing, even after flipping back and forth several times to re-read.
Prospects:
This is a nihilistic crime thriller with some sex and graphic violence. It's commercial; there's a market for this. It currently has the feel of a late night cable movie or a possible midnight movie at film festivals. This is low budget and unlikely to attract marquee actors, but if the budget is kept low enough, the sex and violence might be enough to put the movie in the black.
Pages
84
submitted by tussinland to Screenwriting [link] [comments]

Reddit Chosen Oscars: 2006 Winners

Best Picture
1. The Departed
2. Children of Men
3. Pan’s Labyrinth
4. The Prestige
5. Little Miss Sunshine
6. Babel
6. The Live of Others
8. Casino Royale
9. Borat
10. Letters from Iwo Jima
Best Director
  1. Alfonso Cuarón for Children of Men
  2. Guillermo del Toro for Pan’s Labyrinth
  3. Martin Scorsese for The Departed
  4. Christopher Nolan for The Prestige
  5. Alejandro González Iñárritu for Babel
Best Lead Actor
  1. Sacha Baron Cohen as Borat Sagdiyev in Borat
  2. Leonardo DiCaprio as William "Billy" Costigan in The Departed
  3. Forest Whitaker as Idi Amin in The Last King of Scotland
  4. Christian Bale as Alfred Borden in The Prestige
  5. Hugh Jackman as Robert Angier in The Prestige
Best Lead Actress
  1. Meryl Streep as Miranda Priestly in The Devil Wears Prada
  2. Helen Mirren as Queen Elizabeth II in The Queen
  3. Penélope Cruz as Raimunda in Volver
  4. Ivana Baquero as Ofelia/Princess Moanna in Pan’s Labyrinth
  5. Toni Collette as Sheryl Hoover in Little Miss Sunshine
Best Supporting Actor
  1. Jack Nicholson as Francis "Frank" Costello in The Departed
  2. Eddie Murphy as James "Thunder" Early in Dreamgirls
  3. Djimon Hounsou as Solomon Vandy in Blood Diamond
  4. Matt Damon as Colin Sullivan in The Departed
  5. Mark Wahlberg as Sgt. Sean Dignam in The Departed
  6. Alan Arkin as Edwin Hoover in Little Miss Sunshine
Best Supporting Actress
  1. Jennifer Hudson as Effie White in Dreamgirls
  2. Abigail Breslin as Olive Hoover in Little Miss Sunshine
  3. Rinko Kikuchi as Chieko Wataya in Babel
  4. Adriana Barraza as Amelia Hernández in Babel
  5. Scarlett Johansson as Olivia Wenscombe in The Prestige
Best Original Screenplay
  1. Pan’s Labyrinth
  2. Little Miss Sunshine
  3. Babel
  4. The Lives of Others
  5. Letters from Iwo Jima
Best Adapted Screenplay
  1. The Departed
  2. Children of Men
  3. The Prestige
  4. Borat
  5. Casino Royale
Best Animated Film
  1. Paprika
  2. Cars
  3. Happy Feet
  4. Monster House
  5. Over the Hedge
Best Non-English Language Film
  1. Pan’s Labyrinth
  2. The Lives of Others
  3. The Host
  4. Volver
  5. Letters from Iwo Jima
Best Documentary Film
  1. An Inconvenient Truth
  2. Jesus Camp
  3. This Film Is Not Yet Rated
  4. Iraq in Fragments
  5. Deliver Us from Evil
Best Original Score
  1. Pan’s Labyrinth
  2. Babel
  3. The Fountain
  4. The Departed
  5. The Prestige
Best Original Song
  1. "You Know My Name" from Casino Royale
  2. "Listen" from Dreamgirls
  3. "Our Town" from Cars
  4. "Love You I Do" from Dreamgirls
  5. "I Need to Wake Up" from An Inconvenient Truth
Best Sound
  1. Children of Men
  2. Casino Royale
  3. Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest
  4. The Prestige
  5. Letters from Iwo Jima
Best Production Design
  1. Pan’s Labyrinth
  2. Children of Men
  3. Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest
  4. Marie Antoinette
  5. The Prestige
Best Cinematography
  1. Children of Men
  2. Pan’s Labyrinth
  3. The Prestige
  4. Babel
  5. The Departed
Best Makeup/Hairstyling
  1. Pan’s Labyrinth
  2. Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest
  3. Marie Antoinette
  4. The Prestige
  5. Apocalypto
Best Costume Design
  1. Pan’s Labyrinth
  2. The Devil Wears Prada
  3. Marie Antoinette
  4. The Prestige
  5. Dreamgirls
Best Editing
  1. The Departed
  2. Children of Men
  3. The Prestige
  4. Pan’s Labyrinth
  5. Babel
Best Visual Effects
  1. Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest
  2. Pan’s Labyrinth
  3. Casino Royale
  4. The Host
  5. Superman Returns
Best Voice Acting/Motion Capture Performance
  1. Doug Jones as the Faun in Pan’s Labyrinth
  2. Bill Nighy as Davey Jones in Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest
  3. Paul Newman as Doc Hudson in Cars
  4. Owen Wilson as Lightning McQueen in Cars
  5. Nick Nolte as Vincent in Over the Hedge
Best Directorial Debut
  1. Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris for Little Miss Sunshine
  2. Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck for The Lives of Others
  3. Jason Reitman for Thank You for Smoking
  4. J.J. Abrams for Mission: Impossible III
  5. James Gunn for Slither
Best Ensemble Cast
  1. The Departed
  2. Little Miss Sunshine
  3. Babel
  4. The Prestige
  5. Children of Men
Best Choreography, Stunts or Dance
  1. Casino Royale
  2. Children of Men
  3. Mission: Impossible III
  4. Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest
  5. The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift
Best Soundtrack
  1. Dreamgirls
  2. Little Miss Sunshine
  3. Cars
  4. Children of Men
  5. Marie Antoinette
Best Non-English Language Performance
  1. Penélope Cruz as Raimunda in Volver
  2. Song Kang-ho as Park Gang-du in The Host
  3. Ivana Baquero as Ofelia/Princess Moanna in Pan’s Labyrinth
  4. Ulrich Mühe as Hauptmann Gerd Wiesler in The Lives of Others
  5. Sergi López as Captain Vidal in Pan’s Labyrinth
The full charts for all the categories
submitted by JuanRiveara to Oscars [link] [comments]

Actors Who Were Considered For Oscar Nominated Roles - Would They Still Have Been Nominated/Would They Have Won? Best Actress 1990s

Next up on this list of alternate castings is the Best Actress category in the 1990s. These people were all somehow in line for roles that got nominated for Best Actress but didn’t win. Would any of these performances be better than what we got? Would they have still be nominated? Would they have won? As always, these lists are not exhaustive and not every person will be here for each role; if there are any you think I’ve missed that you think I should have brought up then feel free to post them in the comments. Also if you’ve missed them check my post history and you will see Best Actor from the 90s, all four acting categories and director from 2000-2019, and also all winners in the categories. Anyway, on with the list!
American Beauty (1999) - Sam Mendes had Annette Bening in mind for the role of Carolyn, but the studio suggested several alternatives including HELEN HUNT, HOLLY HUNTER and KIM BASINGER
The End Of The Affair (1999) - MIRANDA RICHARDSON and KRISTIN SCOTT THOMAS were considered for the role of Sarah Miles before Julianne Moore wrote a letter to Neil Jordan asking for the role in the film, which worked
Music Of The Heart (1999) - MADONNA was originally signed on to play Roberta Guaspari, but left the project before filming began, citing creative differences with Wes Craven. SANDRA BULLOCK and MEG RYAN were then briefly considered for the part before Meryl Streep was cast
Elizabeth (1998) - Shekhar Kapur’s first choice for the title role was EMILY WATSON, but she turned it down. Numerous other actors were considered including JULIETTE BINOCHE, HELENA BONHAM CARTER, LUCY LAWLESS and UMA THURMAN
The Wings Of The Dove (1997) - ROBIN WRIGHT turned down the lead role to focus on her family
Titanic (1997) - Lots of actors were considered for the role of Rose, including JENNIFER ANISTON, DREW BARRYMORE, KATE BECKINSALE, JENNIFER CONNELLY, GEENA DAVIS, NICOLE KIDMAN, THANDIE NEWTON, GWYNETH PALTROW, WINONA RYDER and REESE WITHERSPOON, among many others
Marvin’s Room (1996) - ANJELICA HUSTON, JESSICA LANGE, KATHLEEN TURNER and SIGOURNEY WEAVER were all considered for the role of Bessie before Diane Keaton was cast
The English Patient (1996) - Fox wanted a bigger name to play Katharine Clifton than Kristin Scott Thomas, suggesting DEMI MOORE
Breaking The Waves (1996) - HELENA BONHAM CARTER was Lars Von Trier’s first choice for the role of Bess, but she turned it down as she was uncomfortable with the amount of nudity and sexuality required for the role
Casino (1995) - Lots of actors were considered for the role of Ginger, including MELANIE GRIFFITH, NICOLE KIDMAN, MICHELLE PFEIFFER, RENE RUSSO and ex porn star TRACI LORDS, who Scorsese seriously considered after a strong audition
The Bridges Of Madison County (1995) - Clint Eastwood championed Meryl Streep for the role from the start, but Steven Spielberg and author Robert James Waller weren’t keen, suggesting others such as ISABELLA ROSSELLINI, SUSAN SARANDON and CHER
Sense And Sensibility (1995) - Emma Thompson initially intended on NATASHA RICHARDSON playing the lead role, but Columbia insisted on Thompson playing the role herself
Nell (1994) - According to IMDb, ALLY SHEEDY was offered the role of Nell and turned it down
What’s Love Got To Do With It? (1993) - Other actors that were considered for the role included HALLE BERRY, PAM GRIER, WHITNEY HOUSTON, JANET JACKSON and JENIFER LEWIS
Six Degrees Of Separation (1993) - MERYL STREEP was interested in the lead role as she was a fan of the play and had worked with Fred Schepisi on other movies
The Remains Of The Day (1993) - MERYL STREEP turned down the role of Miss Kenton
Shadowlands (1993) - BARBARA STREISAND was asked to direct and star in the film, but turned it down to pursue an adaptation of The Normal Heart (which she never made)
Love Field (1992) - KIM BASINGER was considered for the lead role but ultimately lost out once Michelle Pfeiffer expressed interest
Lorenzo’s Oil (1992) - MICHELLE PFEIFFER allegedly dropped out of the lead role, with Susan Sarandon replacing her
Thelma And Louise (1991) - When she was writing the screenplay, Callie Kouri wanted HOLLY HUNTER to play Thelma and FRANCES MCDORMAND to play Louise. Once the film began pre production, MICHELLE PFEIFFER and JODIE FOSTER were set to play the leads, but dropped out after pre production took too long and they had other commitments. MERYL STREEP and GOLDIE HAWN were the next to sign on, but again dropped out due to scheduling conflicts. Lots of other actors were considered for at least one of the two leads, including ROSEANNA ARQUETTE, CARRIE FISHER, TATUM O’NEAL, DARYL HANNAH, LIZA MINELLI, ANDIE MACDOWELL, JANE SEYMOUR, RENE RUSSO, BETTE MIDLER, DIANE KEATON, KELLY MCGILLIS, HELEN MIRREN, VANESSA REDGRAVE and many, many more
The Grifters (1990) - For the role of Lilly, Stephen Frears first considered CHER, with SISSY SPACEK, GEENA DAVIS and LILY TOMLIN also being considered before Anjelica Huston was cast
Pretty Woman (1990) - Garry Marshall originally envisioned KAREN ALLEN in the role, and once she declined many well known actors of the era were offered the part, including MOLLY RINGWALD, MEG RYAN, MARY STEENBURGEN, DIANE LANE, DARYL HANNAH and MICHELLE PFIEFFER, with other actors auditioning and being turned down before Julia Roberts was cast
Postcards From The Edge (1990) - Janet Leigh wanted to star in the film in Shirley MacLaine’s role alongside her real life daughter JAMIE LEE CURTIS in Meryl Streep’s role
submitted by adalby12 to oscarrace [link] [comments]

Hot take: Quantum of Solace is a critical chapter in the Craig saga and Casino Royale is not completely without it.

While I agree that the film would have greatly benefited from a delay (the screenplay could have definitely used another draft), Quantum is a politically astute and essential entry that offers a satisfying conclusion to Bond's origin story. Greene is a formidable antagonist that seems pretty true to our world today (delivering on the promise of Casino Royale). The climax at the eco-hotel in Bolivia is arguably the most satisfying of the Craig era. The editing is definitely too much in some scenes (I still dunno wtf is going on in the boat chase and I've seen the film several times over) but this is a beautiful sequence (as is the opening sequence, the opera scene, and the plane chase. In the end The reckless, brash agent we met at the start of CR ultimately chooses justice over vengeance, lets go of his rage, cements his commitment to serving his country and becomes the hero we love. Camille captivates as one of the best written Bond girls in the history of the franchise and their friendship develops pretty beautifully (as does Craig's with Leiter). While it doesn't quite reach the heights of Casino Royale, GoldenEye, and On Her Majesty's Secret Service in my book, it's a more than solid entry that adds more to the character than most people realize (I still see it at the bottom of almost every publications rankings). Anyway. I'll defend this one till I die. Hopefully it will be rediscovered as regarded as highly as OHMSS in 50 years.
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Casino Royale (2006) Written by Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, and Paul Haggis. Synopsis. Le Chiffre, a banker to the world's terrorists, is scheduled to participate in a high-stakes poker game in Montenegro, where he intends to use his winnings to establish his financial grip on the terrorist market. M sends Bond – on his maiden mission as a 00 Agent – to attend this game and prevent Le ... Tag: Casino screenplay Best Cosa Nostra Film Scripts. Films set in the organized crime world seem to be really popular among audiences and critics alike, and perhaps even more so in the USA. No other country has produced so many successful movies about the subject, and arguably the explanation for this is found in the very nature of such films and the obscure reality they illustrate. Good ... Author: OTG Software, Inc.NZZZY2ZZZIUZPN3ZZZYZZSZPRZ7ZZ5ZCJ2HDZ Created Date: 1/18/2006 11:46:38 AM Casino: by Nicholas Pileggi: Drexel Screenplay Library: Unspecified script in pdf format: IMDb: video, dvd, book: Casino Royale: by Neal Purvis & Robert Wade (revised by Paul Haggis, based on a novel by Ian Fleming) Scribd: December 13, 2005 draft script in pdf format: IMDb: dvd: Cast Away: by William Broyles, Jr. Daily Script: Undated, unspecified draft script in html format: IMDb: video, dvd ... M doesnt mind you earning. a little money on the side, Dryden.. Shed just prefer it. if it wasnt selling secrets.. If the theatrics. are supposed to scare me. you have the wrong man, Bond.. If M was so sure that I was bent. shed have sent a double-0. Benefits of being section chief. Id know if anyone had been. promoted to double-0 status Voila! Finally, the Casino script is here for all you quotes spouting fans of the movie directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Joe Pesci, Sharon Stone, Kevin Pollak, James Woods, yadda yadda This script is a transcript that was painstakingly transcribed using the screenplay and/or viewings of Casino. I know, I know, I still need to get the cast names in there and I'll be eternally tweaking ... Get this from a library! Casino : screenplay. [Nicholas Pileggi; Martin Scorsese] -- Ace Rothstein is the smooth operator of the Las Vegas Tangiers casino, while Nicky Santoro is his boyhood friend and tough strongman, robbing and shaking down the locals. However, they each have a ... Synopsis: In early-1970s Las Vegas, low-level mobster Sam "Ace" Rothstein (Robert De Niro) gets tapped by his bosses to head the Tangiers Casino. At first, he's a great success in the job, but over the years, problems with his loose-cannon enforcer Nicky Santoro (Joe Pesci), his ex-hustler wife Ginger (Sharon Stone), her con-artist ex Lester Diamond (James Woods) and a handful of corrupt ... CASINO By Nicholas Pileggi EXT. RESTAURANT PARKING LOT, LAS VEGAS, 1983 - DAY SAM 'ACE' ROTHSTEIN, a tall, lean, immaculately dressed man approaches his car, opens the door, and g Casino: Screenplay (English Edition) eBook: Maurosa, Al: Amazon.de: Kindle-Shop Wählen Sie Ihre Cookie-Einstellungen Wir verwenden Cookies und ähnliche Tools, um Ihr Einkaufserlebnis zu verbessern, um unsere Dienste anzubieten, um zu verstehen, wie die Kunden unsere Dienste nutzen, damit wir Verbesserungen vornehmen können, und um Werbung anzuzeigen.

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What is a Casino Script Ready Script for Online Casino ...

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